ISA Registrar Blog

ESD 20:20 Accreditation and ISO Certification Improves Manufacturing

Electronic technologies have come a long way in such a short span of time; it was just a decade ago when cellular phones were still bulky devices devoid of touchscreen functionalities, and computers just started using dual-core processors. Today, electronics are quite ubiquitous, and almost every single person owns at least a mobile phone that can access the Internet. Manufacturers and OEMs that handle the assembly of electronics continue to develop new technologies for the gadgets they create. With the immense popularity and need for electronics, opportunities abound for a manufacturing business aimed at producing parts for devices. It is important for these businesses, however, to strive to achieve ESD 20:20 accreditation and other industry certifications through registered auditors such as International Standards Authority, Inc. The benefits these certifications have for manufacturers can figure greatly in business’ success. The ESD 20:20 and ISO Certifications An ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) 20:20 certification endorses a professional electronic parts manufacturer that maintains a system which reduces the instances of static electricity during production. While static electricity is often harmless, on occasion, the discharge can be powerful enough to destroy unprotected parts and equipment. ESD 20:20 recognizes those manufacturers who have taken preventive steps and implemented programs that reduce the instances of such problems. Vital ISO Certification, on the other hand, proves that the company has a quality management system in place that actively screens the products it creates. It also serves as a tool for manufacturers, giving them management principles that they can rely on in order to improve their processes. To receive these certifications, businesses first need to be appraised by a...

How AS9120 Certification Can Help Ensure Safety in Air Transportation

Aircraft disasters have been happening a lot lately and many frequent travelers are asking: Is it still safe to fly? The truth is current passenger airplanes are significantly more advanced than their predecessors, and are ahead in terms of safety and technology. So, what could be causing these accidents? Pilot Error A BBC News article cites pilot error as the primary cause of most plane crashes worldwide,  accounting for 50% of all fatal accidents, based on statistics from PlaneCrashInfo.com. Data gathered by the International Civil Aviation Organization from 2006 to 2011 showed that a situation known as “controlled flight into terrain” (CFIT) was one of the  prevalent pilot error cases. CFIT accidents involve totally airworthy planes, manned by capable pilots, which were unintentionally flown into terrains, such as bodies of water, mountains, or the ground. Lack of proper communication also caused some of the biggest disasters in air travel history, like the infamous plane crash of 1978. The problem was pretty simple—low fuel—something that any crew member could have mentioned to the main pilot, but nobody did, and the plane ran out of fuel. Mechanical Failure Although most accidents point to pilots as the likely cause, some experts believe that mechanical or equipment failure also largely contribute to crashes. An example is the popular Air France flight 447 incident in 2009, which took three years to resolve. Investigators found that the aircraft’s autopilot mechanism had malfunctioned while in turbulence over stormy seas. Another accident in 1985 was caused by a badly repaired rear pressure bulkhead, which shattered in midair, causing the pilots to lose control of the aircraft. While...

ISO Registration Process: Simple Ways to Impress Your ISO Auditor

For many people, the term “quality” is rather subjective; what one person defines as a “high-quality product” may differ from how another person defines it. What cannot be disputed, however, is that once a process has been approved by a recognized ISO 9001 registrar, that particular process is on par with global quality standards. Of course, ISO 9001 isn’t a requirement for businesses, but it does make a company look impressive. After all, being ISO 9001 certified tells consumers that your business cares about the quality of your products and services. That alone can improve the number of customers you see and the profits your business enjoys. If you are interested in prompt ISO registration, know that you will need to have your entire business process assessed by a certification agency like International Standards Authority, Inc. Naturally, you will have to convince the auditor that your business processes are indeed world class. With that in mind, here are a few tips to help you impress your ISO auditor come assessment day and improve your chances of becoming a full-fledged ISO 9001 certified company: Prepare All Written Documents Beforehand Ask your auditor what he or she will want to see before the day of your assessment. This will give you time to print out and provide your auditor with copies of your procedures, samples of records and other documents that will help the auditor determine if your processes meet the standards set in place by the International Organization for Standardization. Certification assessments take time, and you don’t want to spend a significant chunk of your assessment printing out documents. Educate...

Organizations Should Be Ready for ISO 9001:2015 as Early as Today

ISO 9001 is a global standard that discusses requirements for quality management systems, and organizations make use of this in order to improve their performance, product quality and customer satisfaction. The standard is constantly revised in order to keep up with the times and to improve organizations further. ISO 9001:2015 continues to undergo the revision process, and while it is not quite there yet in terms of replacing the existing standard, it is still on schedule to be released before the end of 2015. Organizations don’t have to make drastic changes right now, but small changes here and there can help when the new standard finally gets here. Quality Digest suggests how “…the new version of ISO 9001 represents not necessarily a change in the actual requirements, rather, the difference in the approach.” It says how it is the mindset that should change, and how organizations and its people should change to reflect this in order to meet the new standard. Organizations should understand that quality is everyone’s responsibility. Everyone should be committed to quality, to its customers and so on. The broader approach enables organizations to focus on improvement, consistency and its customers. There are three areas that can be improved on in anticipation of the new standard, regardless of if the proposed sections are implemented or no (the effects will not lessen the conformance to the existing requirements nor will it create any unnecessary hassles). These areas refer to the context of the organization, elaboration of managing quality objectives and the introduction of risk-based thinking. All of these improvements can be made today and they will give...

AS9100 Certified Companies Demonstrate Effective Quality Management

The AS9100 standard was created specifically for the aviation, space and defense industries. It serves the purpose of achieving significant improvements in those industries in areas of safety, quality and customer service. Companies that are certified with this standard can be confident that they have an effective quality management system, and by extension, so can their customers. According to Aerospace Manufacturing and Design, “Thermacore Inc., a provider of advanced thermal and material solutions, has received full recertification to both AS9100:2009 Rev. C and ISO 9001:2008 Quality Standards at its Lancaster, Pennsylvania, headquarters and manufacturing facility.” The company received recertification for their design, manufacture and distribution of thermal management components and systems. AS9100 is being used by the world’s leading aerospace companies and by their supply chains. There is public demand for safety and reliability which is driving the need for product quality to reach high levels. In order to achieve this, there must be continuous improvement and an integral part of that is having quality management systems. With one in place, a company gets data on a regular basis so that they can see their progress as well as areas for improvement that they need to work on. The standard calls for a lot of responsibilities, and because of this companies see increased involvement of top management with their quality management system, from the setting of quality goals and objectives to the management review to taking steps towards meeting the quality goals. If this is met, there is sure to be increased productivity with continued training and qualification of employees. Furthermore, the needs of customers are better understood and...

Do You Actually Know The Nuts And Bolts Of an ISO 9001 Certification?

A legitimate ISO 9001 certification is an absolute boon for any business, provided that each and every aspect of it is fully understood and appropriate related practices are put to work. A good understanding of what such a certification really means for a business, however, escapes a lot of people. For one, realizing the full benefit of a management system by viewing and managing real processes affecting service and product quality relies on a crucial concept called “process approach.” Such a concept is not new—in truth, it’s specifically how the coveted ISO 9001 certification is designed to work from day one. The thing is: not everyone is taking a process approach these days; they’d rather take a standard-based approach, which is born of a misconception. That misconception purports that ISO 9001 was “intended” to instruct a company’s top brass how to manage, and even contain specific instructions for how to run, a business. It’s not. ISO 9001 is merely intended to provide auditors with a definite set of criteria with which to gauge existing quality management systems (QMS). It is meant to be a set of principles meted out in specific requirements, aimed to offer a basis for a fair assessment and nothing more. Once such a misconception’s roots are eradicated, only then can a company fully reap the benefits of such a certification. Certified companies are generally viewed to be very secure—they have a better chance at giving individuals great job security, as well as the guarantee that any product sold or service rendered is fit for a customer’s use and is set to improve over time. This...